I’m meeting with a group of young pastors and leaders this week and I wanted to share some of the software tools that help me stay organized.  Here’s a quick list of the software I use the most on a day-to-day basis.

  • Evernote – this is an incredible note taking software that I’ve blogged about before.  It allows you to sync notes from your laptop to your ipod to your phone.   It even recognizes and searches the text in imported pictures.  I keep folders for sermon notes, meeting notes, and sermon illustrations.  It’s a great program that you should definitely check out.
  • Remember the Milk – this is an advanced to-do list.  It has tons of options to keep you organized and on-track.
  • Youversion This is one of the best online Bibles. There are iphone and blackberry versions and you can even contribute notes and videos.
  • Biblegateway I also use this online Bible when I need to find stuff fast.  I also like the IVP New Testament Commentaries that they have available.
  • BlueLetterBible I use this online Bible for Greek word studies
  • Logos – I think this is the best desktop Bible software for serious Bible study.  And they now have a mac version.
  • Google Reader – I use this to read through several ministry blogs.
  • Twitter – A great way to stay connected with other ministers and friends throughout the day.

What else do you use on a consistently?

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5 Comments

  1. Rob Swiger
    March 10, 2009 at 1:45 am — Reply

    I use eSword a lot.

  2. March 10, 2009 at 2:44 am — Reply

    video via iphone has been really handy for capturing those moments in ministry

  3. Highlighted Link - Faith Engineer « Web Overload
    April 22, 2009 at 1:02 pm — Reply

    […] Software Tools for Pastors (mine: or missionaries or…) […]

  4. March 7, 2014 at 11:04 am — Reply

    You can thank me later… 🙂 Xmind. It’s a great tool for taking separate pieces of info and assembling them together by dragging and dropping. It’s super-easy to use and xmind files can be exported into other formats like web pages, word docs, images, pdf etc.

    It may be called ‘X’ mind, but that’s the only thing I can find wrong with it. I recommend that you explore their site and check it out. There’s a free version which is fine on it’s own, but the paid version is inexpensive. http://www.xmind.net

    You can also post your xmind files to the web to be shared. I also imagine that advanced users could port the mindmaps into a visual wiki site, where the graphical view is how the wiki is navigated, but I never accomplished it myself, I kinda dropped it halfway. But it’ out there.

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